Ball training…

Typical Saturday morning – laundry, grocery shopping. Also bought a can of the paint I want to use for the doors and trim.  Also another sample pots for the walls. The last one turned out to almost perfectly match the kitchen cupboards – not a color we want for the walls. It can be quite surprising how different paint (especially ‘white’ shades) can look on the wall.

In the afternoon I spent quite a bit of time working with Anzac on retrieving the ball. First I worked to have him drop the ball in my lap. Once he was doing that consistantly I started teaching him to drop it into a cap that I was holding. I’m hoping this will help when we’re playing ball in the park.  If I take a cap…and he’s used to having to put the ball in the cap if he wants it thrown again…perhaps he will.

We went for a late walk along the Burns Beach track. It was much quieter than usual, hardly any bike riders, not many walkers. I guess the cool wind probably put people off, that and the fact it’s Saturday night. The wind is fairly strong, but still we saw a Peregrine Falcon hanging in the sky, giving just a flutter of it’s wings every so often to stabilise in the wind, and every now and then diving to catch a snack. It’s not unusual to see falcons along the coast here and they are amazing to watch.

You aint seen nothin’ yet…

We were awake early again this morning so I took Anzac out for a long walk before it got too hot (35C again). We meandered through the streets down to Burns Beach, arriving a few minutes before 7am. There were cars everywhere, parking in any space, on the grass areas, everywhere halfway along Burns Beach Rd. People were pouring out, many dressed in wetsuits, most obviously preparing to hit the water. I though there must have been some type of surf swim happening. Until we got the walking track and I noticed the Fisheries rangers along the clifftop. I realised its Abalone season; today was the last day. The season is short and strictly controlled. You can collect abalone for one hour (from 7am – 8am) on a Sunday morning only, for four weeks. There are restrictions on the number as size as with other types of fishing and it’s very strictly controlled. Hence the close supervision by the rangers.

There were people everywhere amongst the rocks in the shallows, all waitin

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

Abalone season

g expectantly for the signal that it was 7am. I doubt you’ve ever seen anything like it, I certainly haven’t!